Category Archives: Features

The Countdown Begins

By ISABELLE MOLINA and CORA SHIRCEL

Away go the trips to Jerry Smith’s, the jack o’lanterns, and the colorful leaves. After celebrating Thanksgiving, many people start to get into the holiday spirit with Christmas just on the horizon. Traditions such as sledding, trips to Chicago, and tree decorating come into full swing. Not only is Christmas known for the long winter break it gives its students, but also for the immense amount of spirit it brings to almost everyone. Continue reading The Countdown Begins

The Most Stressful Time of The Year

By BLAIR WEISINGER and JAKOB JENSEN

Even after months of dedication and hard work, your success or failure in a class can hinge on a single, heavily weighted assignment — the final. To further complicate matters, many schools compress all course finals into a single week. This may understandably seem like a recipe for stress and dread, but there are a number of ways to improve your performance during finals week. Here are three to try this winter: Continue reading The Most Stressful Time of The Year

We Should All Be Feminists

By ZOEE ARREGUIN, CHLOE DETHORNE, RAEANNA MAEGAARD

Chimamanda Adichie, the author of We Should All Be Feminists, gives her point of view on feminism through telling her own stories. This novel is a short, eye-opening read on Adichie’s interpretation of feminism. Reading the title, one would think that the author’s motive is to persuade the reader to believe their opinion. After reading, you will realize this is not her intention at all. Continue reading We Should All Be Feminists

Christmas Gift Help

By MORGAN GARSKI, ALEXIS KOESSL andJORDAN SQUIRES

Christmas is known for a time of giving, loving, and spending the holiday with family and friends. Often times, Christmas presents are a way to show loved ones how much you care about them. This is a tricky part of the giving season, because sometimes we can’t think of the ‘perfect gift’. Well we have the answers and the best ideas to suit your struggles! We have made list ideas (that are popular in time) for some of the people we want to give back to the most. Continue reading Christmas Gift Help

A List of Things That Do and Do Not Know Something

By JAROD STURYCZ – The Abstract Section

The color red will not know

If you are still looking at it.

The color purple does not know

It is royal.

Your watch does not know

That it reads the wrong time.

A quarter does not know

It is worth more than a dime.

A crown does not know

On whose head it is.

The color red knows

Its natural element burns.

The color purple will know

Status is not real.

Your watch knows

That it ticks.

A quarter will know

The sound it makes when dropped on the ground.

A crown will know

When it is no longer on someone’s head.

 

New Year, New Bucket List

By ISABELLE MOLINA & CORA SHIRCEL

This year is coming to an end quick and it will soon be 2018. We all have made great memories in 2017 so far, but it’s time to start thinking about plans for the upcoming new year. 2018 is your year to make an amazing bucket list. I’m sure we have all thought of certain things that we want to do in the future or always love doing every year, so why not just compile all of these components into one great list? Continue reading New Year, New Bucket List

Piercings Without Permission

by MITCHEL HUDRICK and ALAINA SNIDER

To pierce or not to pierce. Many people in high school find themselves with the decision of asking their parents to get piercings or just getting piercings without permission. In high school many people are very close to being adults and want to make adult decisions on their own, such as getting piercings. Although they are very close to being able to legally making the decision on their own, some parents say no to new piercings. Continue reading Piercings Without Permission

School Rivalries

By SAVION BEBO, STEPHEN SCHMIDT and EDDIE MAKAR

High school is a time for people to show school spirit with competitiveness in sports. With there being two or more schools people are bound to not like each other because of where the school boundaries end. Before 2006 people would show this competitiveness in person with fights or yelling matches. Now that the internet is popular and almost everyone is on it, people take their aggression and rivalries online. Continue reading School Rivalries

Angel’s Paws

by BRITTNEY GATES

Angel’s Paws is a foster based rescue located in Kenosha and runs completely on donations. This rescue is a small and often overlooked rescue, as it has no central building and isn’t advertised as publicly as the other rescues in Kenosha. It has been running for 11 years and consists of the creator of the rescue, the board, and two volunteers. Continue reading Angel’s Paws

#WorthIt

by ANALICIA TORRES

To many teenagers living in the world of high school, drama is a constant, pain in the you-know-what that every student faces. Whether it comes in the shape of family or friends or “enemies,” the stress of grades and exams, the overly-exaggerated loathing for teachers— every high schooler goes through it. And while breaking up with your best friend does seem an earth-shattering, end-of-the-world thing, ten years from now you can look back on it and laugh. Who knows— maybe you will be friends again in the future. Continue reading #WorthIt

On GMOs

By ROBERTA KELLER and REBECCA KELLER

Since the very beginnings of civilization, humans have been advantageously altering their food through a process known as “artificial selection.”  The term “artificial selection” was first coined by famed naturalist Charles Darwin; he used it to describe the quintessential process of breeding that allows the most useful traits of a species to persist, resulting in the fittest possible organisms. This ancient use of artificial selection acts as a predecessor to the modern breeding technique of creating GMOs, or genetically modified organisms. Continue reading On GMOs

First Five Day Week

By ISABELLE MOLINA and CORA SHIRCEL

Within the month of November, KUSD students were happy to find only one full week of school in the entire month. In the first week, students had Friday off for “asynchronous learning” and the next Friday off in the second week due to the end of the first quarter. Sadly, for the week of November 13th, students are back to the grind with an entire five day week. Continue reading First Five Day Week

Honoring California

By COURTNEY SALISBURY and KATE BERTOG

When will the NRA say enough is enough? It is so very heartbreaking to see what our country has come to after the last few years of devastating violence. Approximately 120 miles from Sacramento,the  rural town Rancho Tehama experienced a traumatic scene on Tuesday, November 14th. Police claim the suspect ran over an elementary school’s gate with his vehicle, and began shooting randomly. Continuing their investigation, police found he shot his neighbors after participating in a fight with them. For now they are saying his fight with his neighbors must of have been correlated with him driving to the school. Continue reading Honoring California

Motivation

by LEXUS PELLEGRINI

Motivation is the reason or reasons one has for acting or behaving in a particular way, or the general desire or willingness of someone to do something. Everyone gets into these moods of sadness or even some might call it moods of depression. For some it is quite hard to crawl out of that hole. Here are a few tips on how to motivate yourself. Continue reading Motivation

Distinction Between Sasquatch and Yeti

By CHARLOTTE MARTIN

Is there a difference between a Sasquatch, A.K.A a Bigfoot, and a Yeti? Are they the same bipedal humanoid, or is there more than one? This is the questions many have asked for decades. Geography is the most important aspect of this tireless investigation. As many are aware, the Sasquatch is native to the North America’s Pacific Northwest region. Most sightings have been in Washington, but there are many accounts of others all over the United States. Continue reading Distinction Between Sasquatch and Yeti

Bitcoin

By FRANK GARCIA

Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency currently worth $7,169 each. Cryptocurrencies are digital currency in which encryption techniques are used to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds, operating independently of a central bank. There are only 21 million bitcoins that exist making the price always fluctuate. Continue reading Bitcoin

ABC’s The Good Doctor: Sad Truths

By ANALICIA TORRES

Dr. Shaun Murphy of ABC’s new hit drama The Good Doctor is several things: determined, genius, and, the show’s main center, autistic. With a stunning performance by actor Freddie Highmore, the characters of this drama strike a particular chord with the audience that is too true to ignore. In the show’s first episode, it is known by viewers that Dr. Murphy has autism; however, he also has savant syndrome: a condition in which a person with disabilities shows a certain affinity for a skill. In this case, Dr. Murphy shows an adept ability for anatomy, which prompts his desire to be a surgeon at St. Bonaventure Hospital in San Jose. The show’s catchphrase “His greatest ability is his greatest challenge” truly does follow the show’s main plot with a disturbing truth. While challenged with the need to be a doctor and the struggle to overcome his superiors’ disdain, Dr. Murphy persists through the show to push himself and test the boundaries of his own mind. Continue reading ABC’s The Good Doctor: Sad Truths

The Greatest Peril of Living in Wisconsin

By ZOEE ARREGUIN, CHLOE DETHORNE and RAEANNA MAEGAARD

The feared “s” word: snow. We, living in Wisconsin, are often told, “This is what you get for choosing to live in this state.” But what makes this white cold substance so unappealing? Maybe it’s the fact that with snow comes the sub 32 degree temperatures. Maybe it’s the great increase of traffic and road collisions. Whatever it is, the fun of snow becomes diminished with every trouble we have to endure here in Wisconsin. Continue reading The Greatest Peril of Living in Wisconsin

Three DIY Holiday Decorations

BY BLAIR WEISINGER

There are so many ways to celebrate the holiday season. And between planning dinners for the family and throwing cocktail parties for friends, hosting can be overwhelming. For holiday hosts, you have to plan the menu, get groceries, cook the meal, plus, clean up before and after. Not to mention, you have to get your space all festive for the dinner or cocktail party. It’s actually possible to survive it by keeping everything simple. And that includes your festive decorations, including DIY décor. Now’s the time to let your creative instincts shine through as you watch your mantels, stairways, and tables come to holiday life. I have some great ideas for getting your house together effortlessly—from your entryway to your dining table. You can make all of these in a weekend or two with the company of friends and family. Continue reading Three DIY Holiday Decorations

Holiday Sales

By MITCHEL HUDRICK and ALAINA SNIDER

SALE!! Many see the word sale and think they are actually saving money but some stores bump up their prices and then put sale prices on their items to make it look like you’re buying something on sale. Many stores have been caught doing this on items to make a better or equal prophet than the items on sale. Continue reading Holiday Sales

iPhone X

By KRISTINA POST

There has been a constant buzz around school every since the new iPhone X was released. Everyone desires to have the new best thing, a and only a few people have actually gotten their hands on it. The new phone does not have a home button, but has a larger screen, slimmer size, and has the ability to take better photos. Students who have the phone are excited to show their classmates the new phone and enjoy the excitement and jealousy of their peers. It is an awesome new device that allows people to engage in the newest technology. Continue reading iPhone X

Average Hangout with “The Boyz”

By STEPHEN SCHMIDT, SAVION BEBO and EDDIE MAKAR

We three are a part of a friend group which is a great coincidence because we are in the same Journalism class. The group that hangs out normally are Stephen, Eddie, Savion, Harry Orth, and Justus Siltala. The name “The Boyz” is unknown and not really clear, but the name naturally fits. We probably hangout, on average, once every two weeks. But  may not be often because of work and sports training. When we finally meet up it’s a fun time. Continue reading Average Hangout with “The Boyz”

Who Do You Want Standing Next to You?

by BRIANNA NORTON

“Imagine a future moment in your life where all your dreams come true, you know? It’s the greatest moment of your life and you get to experience it with one person. Who’s standing next to you?” – Peyton Sawyer.

During your life you are going to experience lows and highs; during those lows and highs you should always have someone next to you to give you reasons; reasons to keep going. But who is that person? A parent, sibling, family member, friend? Why are they the person you chose? Continue reading Who Do You Want Standing Next to You?

Snakes as Pets

By AMBER YOUNG

Everyone has a favorite animal. Personally, I adore panda bears and polar bears. But there’s one animal I hear less and less good things about: snakes. This I sort of understand. Some snakes can be terrifying, especially if one bite can kill you. But I’m talking about different types that are far more friendly than, say, a cobra. Continue reading Snakes as Pets

Lower Manhattan Tragedy

By CHARLOTTE MARTIN

On Tuesday, October 31st, a terror attack occurred in Manhattan. A man driving a pickup truck drove onto a bike path along the Hudson River and allegedly killed eight people, injuring eleven. The man was later identified as Sayfullo Saipov, 29, an immigrant from Uzbekistan who has been living in the United States for seven years. He has pledged his allegiance to ISIS, screaming “Allahu Akbar!” as he got out of his rented truck after crashing into a school bus. He was shot in the stomach by an officer, identified as Ryan Nash. Saipov was involved in previous investigations about ISIS, but never directly, until now. Continue reading Lower Manhattan Tragedy

Taking a Mental Health Day?

BY BRITTNEY GATES and AUTUMN KAPLAN

Mental health is a very controversial topic. Many people that do not suffer from mental illnesses often do not believe that they even exist. Schools are one of the most controversial places for mental illnesses, and often one of the most challenging. Schools push stress, anxiety, and many other problematic things onto students everyday. People with mental illnesses often struggle more during the school year, wrestling with all the responsibilities of balancing their lives, work, and school on one plate. Often times things get too rough, and people just need a break from it. Continue reading Taking a Mental Health Day?

The Hidden Treasure of Uptown   

By KIONA BABEL

Nestled between Sheridan Road and Uptown lies on of Kenosha’s greatest community treasures- the Kenosha Literacy Council. Despite being a part of Kenosha since 1965, now sharing a building with the Uptown Library, it’s easy to miss- a cursory glance might even skip over the entire building. However the KLC, while unfamiliar to most English speaking members of the community, it like a second home for many people. Though at times an invisible demographic, the Council is the number one resource in Kenosha for adults seeking English literacy. Continue reading The Hidden Treasure of Uptown   

Standardized Testing

By COURTNEY SALISBURY and KATE BERTOG

Towards the 1990’s, school administrators began experimenting with students testing and their growth. They believed it would be the best indicator of how well students learn and to measure their improvement over the course of a year. Once the 2000’s came around, it was routine for students to regularly take these tests. It is assumed that administrators pushed these tests in hopes of children possessing more motivation to learn and be better students. In return, the competition within standardized testing only makes the students feel worse about themselves and the way they scored. Continue reading Standardized Testing

Day of The Dead

by ALAINA SNIDER

Day of the Dead, also known as Día de Muertos, is a Mexican holiday originating from central and southern regions of Mexico. But, it is also celebrated wherever the people of Mexican heritage may migrate to, including the United States. This year, the multi day celebration begins on October 31st (the day of Halloween) and continues through November 2nd. Continue reading Day of The Dead

Six Eyeshadow Palettes to OBSESS Over

BY BLAIR WEISINGER

Two types of people exist in the world: those who keep the plastic film layer on top of their makeup palettes because the shades are too beautiful to use, and those who use their palettes until they hit the pan and completely run out. The following 12 palettes are as beautiful in the packaging as they are when applied, so no matter which type of person you identify with, you’re guaranteed to find one below to add to your collection. Continue reading Six Eyeshadow Palettes to OBSESS Over

5 Tips to Conquer Procrastination

BY BRITTNEY GATES

Make a schedule: Get a planner, write down an organized schedule of what needs to be done at what times. Pace yourself. Give yourself breaks. Try to make the schedule realistic, don’t overwhelm yourself.

Have incentives in place: Give yourself incentives, little things that will make you want to complete the task at hand. It can be candy, a shower, bath, a Netflix episode, anything that you can use to your advantage. Once you have completed a task on your schedule, treat yourself to a small reward. This will motivate you to do the tasks, and ultimately help you. Continue reading 5 Tips to Conquer Procrastination

Sugar, Spice, and Everything Nice

by AMBER YOUNG

Alas, Halloween has now passed. Hopefully everybody had a good time! I have enough candy to last me for weeks, even then I don’t know if it would be all gone by then. Anyway, it’s still autumn, and there’s still so much to do. Like Thanksgiving! No, I’m not getting into that quite yet. Not sure if I will. Believe me when I say even if I did, it would be one long article. Continue reading Sugar, Spice, and Everything Nice

On the FDA

By ROBERTA KELLER

Most people have a general understanding of the responsibilities of the Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, and with their understanding comes the impression that the FDA is terrible at administrating anything.  Stereotypical opinions consist of a combination of the following assertions: it takes too long for the FDA to pass anything or uncover the hidden agendas of major corporations, the FDA does not possess enough power, the FDA allows Americans to be poisoned daily, the FDA holds too much power, and the FDA accomplishes nothing. Continue reading On the FDA

Traveling During the Holidays

by BRIANNA NORTON

Traveling during the holidays can be very stressful. It was said that traveling by air, the Wednesday before Thanksgiving was to be the busiest travel day; that is a myth, the busiest air travel day changes almost every year. It is still in the top ten of busiest travel days. A travel day that is actually more busier than the Wednesday before Thanksgiving is three days before Christmas, whether it is by car or by airplane. Three days before Christmas is busy because many families are getting together as a whole or going to warmer places to celebrate. Continue reading Traveling During the Holidays